Tag Archive

When Islamophobia Turns Violent: The 2016 U.S. Presidential Elections

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report highlights trends and patterns surrounding Islamophobia since the start of the 2016 U.S. presidential election cycle. It does so in the broader context of hatred, violence and social hostilities confronting Muslims as a minority faith group in contemporary America and with a particular focus on acts and threats of violence. Since 2015, [...]

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Trends in Islamophobia: Focus on UK

Last week, on April 11th, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom hosted a conversation, Europe at a Crossroad:  Civil Society Efforts to Counter Religious Hatred and Bigotry in Europe, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Akeela Ahmed, a member of the UK Working Group on Anti-Muslim Hatred, was among the European civil [...]

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Bridge Initiative Hosts Panel Discussion on Race, Religion, and the 2016 Election

Against the backdrop of an election season characterized by unbridled anti-Muslim rhetoric, and a broader political landscape littered by hostile expressions towards refugees and minorities, Georgetown University’s Bridge Initiative hosted an afternoon panel discussion that brought together celebrated experts to examine the nexus between race, religion, and presidential politics. The event came just as the [...]

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Mr. Trump, the kids can hear you (and other ways Muslim children are experiencing Islamophobia)

The recent execution-style murders of two reported American Muslim men – including a teenager – of Sudanese descent in Indiana comes with suspicion about possible motives.  With the execution-style murders of three American Muslim youth near the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill barely one year behind us, many suspect foul play predicated on growing […]

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After Chapel Hill Shootings, Attacks on Muslims Increased

February 10, 2016 is the first anniversary of the murders of Deah Barakat, Yusor Abu-Salha, and Razan Abu-Salha, the young American Muslims who were shot and killed by their neighbor in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Their deaths were covered in national newspapers and on nightly news broadcasts. Hashtags and fundraising campaigns emerged to remember their lives. President Obama [...]

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The 10 Best and Worst Responses to the Paris Attacks

Shortly after the series of attacks in Paris that left over 100 people dead, people around the world were taking to the Internet to voice their reactions. The assault, which ISIS claims it carried out, elicited millions of messages of solidarity, including from Muslim leaders and regular people, around the world, with the French people, [...]

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Syrian Refugee “Flood:” Fearmongering Ignores Facts

In the wake of the Syrian refugee crisis, which has forced more than four million people to flee that country’s civil war, fears over the geopolitical fallout have gripped some quarters of the American public. Amid intense conversations about how to deal with the throngs of stranded people seeking shelter and safety in the West, right-wing […]

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UK: Spike in Anti-Muslim Attacks Casts Spotlight on Government Policies

Recent videos showing anti-Muslim abuse on public transportation in the UK have renewed conversations about Islamophobia, its consequences, and how to deal with a spike in attacks that target followers of Islam. In mid-October, a woman on a London bus launched a profanity-laced tirade at a pregnant Muslim passenger, threatening to kick her in the [...]

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Online Resources on Anti-Muslim Bias Incidents

Islamophobia is a problem, but many people still don’t know that. Prejudice and discrimination on the basis of (perceived) religious identity is something many Muslims have dealt with, but incidents of anti-Muslim prejudice and discrimination — not to mention broader statistics — aren’t widely publicized. In our piece, “Attacks Against Muslims You Haven’t Heard About,” [...]

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In UK, False Stories About Muslims Fuel Hate Crimes & Prejudice

In the past week, three pieces about Islamophobia in the UK caught our attention. They underscore the depth of anti-Muslim prejudice in British society, and point to some of the reasons behind it. On Tuesday, The Guardian reported that a study conducted by the charity Show Racism the Red Card (SRTRC) revealed that more than one-third of schoolchildren in the UK believe […]

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A Tennessee Man Planned to Slaughter Muslims in New York. The Media Was Silent.

Islamberg is a rural village in Hancock, New York founded in the late 1980s by American Muslims. Robert Doggart, a Tennessee man and failed Congressional candidate, wanted to burn the town to the ground and kill its residents. Doggart, 63, was recorded on a wiretapped line discussing plans to travel to the small New York [...]

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Europe: Muslim Women Most At Risk for Violent, Racially Motivated Attacks

Of the nearly 50,000 racially motivated crimes in Europe in 2013, Muslim women were among those targeted most often. Today, they remain the group that is most at risk for such attacks. The attacks are often physical and "very violent." This is according to a new report published by the European Network Against Racism (ENAR), which Newsweek covered this [...]

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New Study Highlights the Damaging Effects of Islamophobia on Muslim Women

Close your eyes. Imagine a Muslim woman. What image comes to mind? Likely, she’s wearing a veil of some sort. Over time, the veil has come to symbolize the identity of Muslim women, despite the fact that not all Muslim women choose to wear it. In American and European societies, where Muslims represent a small [...]

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France’s (Really Long) Islamophobia Problem

Two days after the attacks on the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris, a UK-based hate crimes monitoring organization, TellMAMA, had already documented 15 Islamophobic attacks in France targeting Muslim individuals or their places of work and worship. Mosques were vandalized with graffiti and sprayed with bullets; an explosion went off outside a Muslim-owned kabob shop; [...]

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Blurred Lines: The Dangers of Confusing Race & Religion After 9/11

Simran Jeet Singh is not Muslim; he’s Sikh. But he’s all too familiar with Islamophobia. During his post-9/11 childhood, other kids nicknamed him “Saddam” and “sand n*gger.” His experience, and those of other Sikhs and Arabs who are not Muslim but who were the target of anti-Muslim attacks, is a reminder that Islamophobia has huge […]

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